Doctor who engaged in ‘elaborate fraud’ to get work struck off register

High Court president Mr Justice Peter Kelly ordered Dr Idowu Adeyemi Adeboro cannot apply for registration for ten years. Photograph: Chris Maddaloni/Collins

A doctor who engaged in an “elaborate fraud” in seeking to obtain employment in Ireland, including claiming to have worked for a non-existent Dublin hospital and providing false references, has been struck off the medical register.

Dr Idowu Adeyemi Adeboro cannot apply for registration for another ten years, High Court president Mr Justice Peter Kelly also ordered.

The judge said on Monday there was “every reason” for making the orders as the doctor had engaged in “breath-taking dishonesty on an elaborate scale”.

He had claimed a work history at hospitals which did not exist and had provided bogus references, one from an English doctor who does not exist and another from a US doctor who does exist but who gave evidence he had never met Dr Adeboro, the judge said.

Dr Adeboro had demonstrated no insight into his conduct, he added.

He agreed with the Medical Council the orders sought by it under the Medical Practitioners Act 2007 were proportionate and necessary to ensure public safety and protect the reputation of the profession.

At an earlier court hearing, held in camera, Dr Adeboro was suspended from the register pending further order.

He was registered here in July 2017 but has never worked here and had told the Council he has never been to Ireland.

On Monday, JP McDowell, solicitor for the Council, told the judge Dr Adeboro, with an address at Apsledene, Gravesend, UK, is a native of Nigeria, holds a Spanish passport and qualified in medicine in Romania.

Suspicious

Mr McDowell said an investigation was initiated, leading to a hearing before a Fitness to Practise Committee (FTPC), after a recruitment agency made a complaint in April 2018 arising from it having become suspicious about the authenticity of references relating to the doctor and about a work history on his CV when he applied for first registration in May 2017.

The FTPC found various allegations were proven, including that, around March 22nd, 2018, the doctor incorporated and/or registered or caused to be incorporated/registered a limited company under the name “Saint Emmanuel Hospital European Medical Center Healthcare Ltd”, with a registered addresses at Harcourt Street, Dublin, in order to create and/or support a false employment history as a medical practitioner when there was no such hospital operating from that address.

It was also proven he had submitted, or caused/allowed to be submitted, a CV to Niche Jobs Ltd and/or Cowley Brown Recruitment in which he represented he was a resident medical officer in emergency and/or general medicine at “St Emmanuel Hospital European Medical Centre, Dublin,” from August 1st 2017 “to present” when that was not true.

It was proven he had represented he was a junior doctor in emergency medicine at “SMHG Hospital Standard Medical Healthcare Group, London, UK”, between December 1st, 2016 and July 30th, 2017 when that was not true and there was no such UK hospital.

It was further proven the CV represented he was a clinical fellow engaging in an “attachment/observership” at the “Cancer Institute of Florida, Weston, Florida” from September 1st, 2016 to November 28th, 2016 when that was not true.

Dr Adeboro did not attend the inquiry and was not represented.

“prolonged pattern of dishonesty” was “disturbing and incompatible with being a registered medical practitioner”.

The FTPC concluded his conduct amounted to professional misconduct at the most serious end of the spectrum

The Medical Council concurred and agreed with the Committee that Dr Adeboro’s registration should be cancelled.

How Technology Can Help

In 2020 software is available to allow automated reference checking, this means you can enter the details of the doctor into a new check request and it will be verified using technology and human verification. Companies such as RefNow could have checked Dr Adeboro’s employment references for under £10 and found any employment gaps or potentially fraudulent employment history.

The future of technology within recruitment for the healthcare sector in certainly in it’s early stages and we expect to see more and more uses for technology to assist with the important job of verifying peoples employment history and checking the information they present on their CV’s is a true representation of themselves.

Original story: https://www.irishtimes.com/news/crime-and-law/courts/high-court/doctor-who-engaged-in-elaborate-fraud-to-get-work-struck-off-register-1.4168814